At Last the Media Gets it Right, No Bananageddon

Finally, reasonable coverage about the impending demise of the banana.  Read more here, from Fresh Fruit Portal.  Thanks for reading, B Jim.

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Portable Precooler is Cash Flow Positive from Day One with Leasing

(Media, Pennsylvania USA)

The Jet-Precooler™ is portable, powerful, and profitable. And now, according to Global Cooling Inc., it is available at the cost of a low monthly payment.

“Other the last six months, we’ve had detailed discussions with a number of financial institutions,” explained Jim Still, Global’s founder and president, “working to find the best match, a lender that is familiar with agricultural needs, as well as those of small  businesses.”

“Today, we are very pleased to announce,” he said, “that we have reached an agreement with one of America’s premier equipment leasing companies, Crest Capital, to provide financing for our Jet Precoolers.”

“Moisture is freshness, and freshness sells” said Still, who is known to many as “Banana Jim”, for having invented the Tarpless® ripening system with his first successful start-up, which was sold to a Dutch multinational in 1997.

“Prompt and proper precooling,” Still explained, “is a postharvest magic that reduces produce and floral respiration, and in so doing, minimizes water loss, which is the key to maximizing shelf life and salable weight, and preserving curb appeal and flavor.”

“What goes unnoticed by many,” according to Still, “is that all postharvest gains, achieved by operating a better cold chain, drop straight to the bottom line as pure profit.” Continuing with his example, Still added “If a grower or packer can suddenly realize an extra 1% product weight to sell, if he or she sells by the pound or kilo, that additional revenue is all pure profit, in many cases adding 25% or more to the company’s total profit amount.”

The Jet Precooler has two 10 HP axial fans, mounted on a galvanized steel frame, with an onboard computer controller and color touchscreen operator interface. It also comes with foam pads, a tarp, and all necessary and required electrical safeties and controls. It is shipped completely assembled and tested, with a 25 foot long heavy duty cord and twist-lock plug end, ready for immediate use.

The Jet units are very popular with 3PL/service providers in the United States that receive imported produce, crossing by tractor trailer from Mexico, or delivered by vessels and planes at ports and airports. For them, the Jets are used to recool fruit, vegetables, and flowers, that have warmed in transit, or while awaiting inspection by customs or USDA officials, which are but two of the ways the cold chain can break down.

About Global Cooling Inc. Global Cooling Inc. recently celebrated its 16 year anniversary. Its principals each have more than 22 years experience with forced-air cooling. Global is a worldwide leader in development and manufacturing of forced-air precoolers, recoolers, and ripening rooms.

About Crest Capital. Established in 1989, Crest is a national equipment finance lender providing the best equipment leasing and equipment financing rates for companies with three or more years history. Crest offers a broad array of equipment lease and loan agreements at affordable monthly rates, enabling investments in capital equipment that can then be cash-flow positive from the first day.

For more information, see www.PreCoolers.net. Or eMail to: Solutions@Pre-Coolers.net. Or call 1-610-248-9800. Jim Still, President/CVO, Global Cooling Inc.

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The Relationship Between Temperature and Produce Quality

by Jim Thompson

 Temperature is the most important factor controlling the postharvest life of fresh produce.  Holding produce at its lowest safe temperature will reduce:

  1. Flavor and nutrition loss caused by respiration,
  2. Weight loss caused by transpiration through the surface of the product,
  3. Decay caused by mechanical damage and fungal infection, and
  4. Color, flavor and premature ripening caused by exposure to ethylene gas, a common pollutant in produce cold storages.

The general rule is to cool produce to its lowest possible temperature as quickly as possible after harvest and keep it cold throughout the handling chain.

What is the lowest safe temperature for produce?

Most green vegetables should be cooled to near 32°F (0°C). Many fruit-type vegetables (for example tomatoes, peppers) are chilling sensitive and should be kept at 45° to 55°F (7° to 13°C). Melons vary in their optimum temperature, but most are held in the range of 40° to 50°F (4°C to 10°C). Fruits and berries should be held at 32°F (°0C) with the exception of tropical origin fruits like bananas, mango, papaya, etc. Actually, most fruits have a high sugar content and can be held a few degrees below 32°F without being subject to freezing injury. For the optimum temperature of a specific produce item consult http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu or http://www.ba.ars.usda.gov/hb66/contents.html.

How quickly after harvest should produce be cooled to its storage  temperature?

This varies from a few hours to a day depending on the item. The table below gives some examples of acceptable cooling delays. However these times assume the product is kept out of direct sun and near room temperature, and is healthy fruit harvested in favorable weather.

 Acceptable cooling delay (hours)

Fruits & Melons Vegetables

2

Strawberry, grape if >30°C

4

Apricot, cantaloupe Asparagus, mushroom, leafy green vegetables, sweet corn

8

Avocado, grape if <20°C, kiwifruit, mandarin, peach, nectarine, Artichoke, bell pepper, cauliflower, carrot, summer squashes, cucumber, eggplant, green bean, green onion,

16

Honeydew, orange, pear, persimmon, plum Garlic, dry onion, peppers, potato, sweet potato, tomato

24

Apple, grapefruit, lemon,

 A few items, like bananas, pears, avocados, stonefruit, and tomatoes, are held near room temperature before marketing to condition them or initiate ripening. This is a specialized process and must be carefully managed to get good market quality.

What if my facility is not capable of cooling my product to recommended temperature?

Partial cooling is much better than no cooling at all. Some people start with cooling only the product that must have the longest shelf life. Others cool all of their product to an intermediate temperature. This shows them how temperature management can increase profit and later they invest in facilities that can provide optimum temperature management.

If my product is going to rewarm in handling, is it better to not cool it rather than subject it to cooling and then reheating?

Best quality is obtained by keeping produce as cold as possible as long as possible. Rewarming is not desirable, but not cooling at all is even worse.

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Global Ripening receives 2013 Pennsylvania Excellence Award

February 17th 2014 -  Global Ripening has been selected for the 2013 Pennsylvania Excellence Award amongst all its peers and competitors by the US Institute for Excellence in Commerce (USIEC).

Each year the USIEC conducts business surveys and industry research to identify companies that have achieved demonstrable success in their local business environment and industry category. They are recognized as having enhanced the commitment and contribution of small businesses through service to their customers and community. Small businesses of this caliber enhance the consumer driven stature that Pennsylvania is renowned for.

Global Ripening has consistently demonstrated a high regard for upholding business ethics and company values. This recognition by USIEC marks a significant achievement as an emerging leader within various competitors and is setting benchmarks that the industry should follow.

As part of the industry research and business surveys, various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the selected companies in each category. This research is part of an exhaustive process that encapsulates a year long immersion in the business climate of Pennsylvania.

For more information about Global Ripening, see www.GlobalRipening.com, and also www.PreCoolers.net.

About USIEC

The USIEC is a leading authority on researching, evaluating and recognizing companies across a wide spectrum of industries that meet its stringent standards of excellence. It has spearheaded the idea of independent enterprise and entrepreneurial growth allowing businesses of all sizes to be recognized locally and encouraged globally.

Particular emphasis is given to meeting and exceeding industry benchmarks for customer service, product quality and ethical practices. Industry leading standards and practices have been developed and implementation of the same has been pioneered by the dedicated efforts of the business community and commerce leadership.

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Precooling Tips and Techniques now available Online

(Philadelphia, PA, USA)

According to the experts, the single most important step in postharvest care of fresh produce is prompt and proper precooling. (Precooling is defined as reducing the temperature of freshpicked or -packaged perishables down to their ideal storage temperature as quickly as possible. This is also known as blast-cooling or blast-chilling.) Once a product has lost some of its moisture, there is no way to “put it back in.” As we all know, moisture is freshness, and freshness sells.

For a grower, packer, or logistics provider, often the learning curve for forced-air precooling can be steep and difficult. There is no website or book that concentrates only on precooling. “While precooling temperature reduction time can be very difficult to predict,” explains Jim Still of Global Cooling Inc., “there is a science to precooling, that applies to all commodities and all packaging.”

Global Cooling is one of the world’s leading designers and manufacturers of forced-air cooling equipment and controls, pioneering the Jet™ and Rapid-Cool™ precoolers, as well as Smart-Cool™ operating software.

“We decided to put all of our forced-air precooling information in one place,” continued Still, “and make it available for free to the public. An educated customer is our best friend,” he said with a smile.

Jim Thompson, of UC-Davis, is an adviser to Global Cooling, and co-author of “Commercial
Cooling of Fruits, Vegetables, and Flowers”. Dr. Thompson has authored five special reports – which take some of the mystery out of precooling – and these are all available exclusively at Global’s precooling website, www.PreCoolers.net, in the Knowledge Base section.

The report titles include: Temperature and Quality, How to Cool Produce, Tips for Successful Forced-Air Cooling, Product Temperature in Forced-Air Cooling, and Measuring Product Temperature.

The website page also contains a number of other articles about precooling, and more are
slated to be added on an ongoing basis.

“I think that the most important thing to keep in mind about forced-air precooling, for those who are not doing any as of now,” Still concluded, “is that you just need to make a start, and then learn by doing. And they can always come to us with any questions they might have.”

For more information, see www.Pre-Coolers.net. Or eMail to: Solutions@Pre-Coolers.net. Or call 1-610-248-9800. Jim Still, President/CVO, Global Cooling Inc.

DSC_8712

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Free Report: Fresh Produce “Temperature and Quality”, by Jim Thompson

(Philadelphia, PA, USA)

Global Cooling Inc. offers a white paper, “Temperature and Quality”, by Jim Thompson, UC-Davis.  This is the first in a series of informational articles about Forced-Air Precooling.

“Temperature is the most important factor controlling the postharvest life of fresh produce,” according to Jim Still, President and Founder of Global Cooling Inc., which specializes in forced air precooling and ripening.

An excerpt from the paper:

Q:  “If my product is going to rewarm in handling, is it better to not cool it rather than subject it to cooling and then reheating?”

A:  Best quality is obtained by keeping produce as cold as possible as long as possible. Rewarming is not desirable, but not cooling at all is even worse.

To request your copy of the paper, eMail us.

We Build the World’s Best Ripening Rooms & Precoolers.

www.PreCoolers.net
www.GlobalRipening.com
www.NE-Postharvest.com

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Portable Forced-Air Precooling Tunnel Available

(Philadelphia, PA, USA)

There is a new, ready-to-use Precooling System, from Global Cooling Inc. The powerful unit comes completely assembled and ready to use.

The Jet-Ready Precooler features two 10HP fans mounted on a hot-dipped galvanized steel frame. IMG_1007When used with eight (8) pallets, it delivers more than 4,000 cfm per pallet, at normal static pressure.

“We are constantly striving to make our products better, to provide more value for our customers,” explained Global Cooling’s CVO, Jim “Banana Jim” Still. “Over the years, we’ve had a number of operators ask for a ready-to-use unit, and that spurred us to come up with this new offering” 

The first-of-its-kind unit comes on a structural steel base that measures 48-inches wide x 4-inches deep, and can be easily moved by a forklift.

The Jet-Ready also includes foam pads and tarp, variable frequency drive motor controller, electrical disconnect, motor overloads, a touchscreen control panel, and flashing beacon light pole to signal ready, cooling, and done/holding. An adjustable timer also allows for automatic change to low speed or off at the ended of a programmed time period.

The Jet-Ready does not include it’s own cooling coil or compressor, but instead circulates already-cooled air from inside the existing cold storage warehouse.

The unit is ideal for inspected cold stores,” Still continued, “as well as for food processing or manufacturing plants that need spot-cooling, or -drying, of in-process product.”IMG_0872(1)

All of the controls and electrical safeties are furnished in Nema-4X/IP65 enclosures, in addition to being completely pre-wired and tested.

A “magnehelic gage” is also provided, so that the strength of the airflow can be measured and controlled.

For more information about Jet Precoolers, see.  www.Pre-Coolers.net. Or eMail to:  Solutions@Pre-Coolers.net. Jim Still, President/CVO, Global Cooling Inc. NE-USA Headquarters, 170 Foxcatcher Lane, Media, PA 19063 USA. Phone 1-610-248-9800.

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“Jet-Ready™” Precooler Comes Ready-to-Use

(Philadelphia, PA)

The Jet-Ready Precooler features two 10-HP fans mounted on a hot-dipped galvanized steel frame. When used with eight (8) pallets, it delivers more than 4,000 cfm per pallet, at normal static pressure.

“We are constantly striving to make our products better, to provide more value for our customers,” explained Global Cooling’s CVO, Jim “Banana Jim” Still. “Over the years, we’ve had a number of    operators ask for a ready-to-use unit, and that spurred us to come up with this new offering” IMG_1007

The Jet-Ready also includes foam pads and tarp, variable frequency drive motor controller, electrical disconnect, motor overloads, a touchscreen control panel, and flashing beacon light pole to signal ready, cooling, and done/holding. An adjustable timer also allows for automatic change to low speed or off at the ended of a programmed time period.

The Jet-Ready does not include it’s own cooling coil or compressor, but instead circulates already-cooled air from inside the existing cold storage warehouse.

The unit is ideal for inspected cold stores,” Still continued, “as well as for food processing or manufacturing plants that need spot-cooling, or -drying, of in-process product.”

All of the controls and electrical safeties are furnished in Nema-4X/IP65 enclosures, in addition to being completely pre-wired and tested.

A “magnehelic gage” is also provided, so that the strength of the airflow can be measured and monitored.P1000882

For more information about Jet Precoolers, see.  www.Pre-Coolers.net. Or eMail to:  Solutions@Pre-Coolers.net. Jim Still, President/CVO, Global Cooling Inc. NE-USA Headquarters, 170 Foxcatcher Lane, Media, PA 19063 USA. Phone 1-610-248-9800.

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Ethylene Gas Deserves Your Respect

Ethylene gas is a naturally occurring plant ripening hormone.  Its chemical formula is C2H4, it is a hydrocarbon.

Ethylene gas for fruit ripening and degreening, is commonly available in three forms:

  • Catalytic Generators, which use an ethanol-mix, to produce pure ethylene gas.
  • Ripe-Gas mix, cylinders containing approximately 5% ethylene and 95% nitrogen or “Air”.
  • Pure Ethylene Gas, 99.5% ethylene in cylinders.

Ripe-Gas is completely safe, and cannot ignite or explode. Pure Ethylene can be extremely dangerous, and is flammable starting at 28,000 ppm (2.8%) mixed with air, and at higher concentrations too, up to a point at which there is not enough oxygen to support combustion.  Catalytic Generator produced ethylene, can be dangerous too, if too much liquid is used to produce ethylene gas in too small a ripening room.  One quart of Ethy-Gen makes 10.7 cubic feet of ethylene gas, so if used in a room of only 382 cubic feet air volume, it becomes explosive (the math: 10.7 / .028).

Using ethylene sensors to control the gassing process, is flat-out a good idea.

Ethy-Gen-MSDSRipe-Gas MSDS  Ripe-Gas MSDS

Link to more on ethylene gas safety at Catalytic Generators.

Thanks for reading!  Banana Jim jim@BananaJim.com.

www.CA-Ripening.com     www.PreCoolers.net    www.NE-Postharvest.com

Ripening Room Explosion

 

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The ROI of Precooling & Postharvest

The financial benefits of prompt and proper precooling can be measured.

Selling fresh produce that weighs more and last longer, adds profits directly to the bottom line.  And helps to build and protect your brand-name-equity.

It is our pleasure to present here, from our colleague Adel A. Kader, Professor Emeritus of  Postharvest Physiology, University of California – Davis, “The ROI of Postharvest Technology.

See more at www.Precoolers.net and www.NE-Postharvest.com.

Thanks for reading! Jim Still. eMail Me.

 

 

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